Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for January, 2012

Many times those people who want to present the God of the Bible in very negative light portray him as one who asks his people to ruthlessly kill and drive out other people. They would quote verses like Numbers 33:52, “you shall drive out all the inhabitants of the land . . . “ In reality, the Hebrew word, yarash, is a missional word.  It is the same word, which is used to describe the people possessing the land (Num. 33:53). They were not supposed to destroy or drive out the people, but rather missionally possess the people, so that they turn towards the God of the Bible- the one who loves, saves and recreates.

 

Read Full Post »

Sodom and Gomorrah has been an oft-used narrative in so many debates and discussions.  In some circles the God of the Bible is portrayed as a ruthless killer. The Targums, ancient translations of the Bible into Aramaic, the language of Jesus and the Apostles, reads “The WORD, MEMRA, of the LORD brought down a gentle rain upon Sodom and Gomorrah, so that they would turn towards him. But, they did not! . . .” (Genesis 19:24).

God has always been a God of mercy and grace, and longs for humanity to repent of their systemic and personal sins.

 

Read Full Post »

“The LORD appeared to Abraham . . . he looked up and saw three men” (Genesis 18:1, 2), an encounter which has been a great puzzle for many generations of readers. Is it God, or is it three men, who is this encounter talking about? The modern mind says, “It is one or the other. It cannot be both.” The ancient exegetes, both Jewish and Gentile say, “It is both. It is God’s revelation to humanity in human form. Who else can do this, but God himself?” These kinds of encounters happen many times in the Hebrew Bible. Finally, says the News Testament, God reveals himself through the human face of God- Jesus the Messiah. (Hebrews 1: 1, 2)

 

Read Full Post »

Throughout the history of Christianity, followers of the Messiah Jesus have always considered themselves to be sacrificial offerings- just like they found in the readings from the Book of Leviticus, just like their Messiah, the suffering Lamb of God!

The persecuted Church, in the majority world, still considers itself to be a sacrificial offering of Thanksgiving (Hebrew, Toda) to God!

(Hebrews 13:15; Leviticus 7)

Read Full Post »

Historically, people who have been used by God-just like Abraham, have always been people who deliberately and conscientiously walked in the presence of El Shaddai– God who constantly and consistently brings fruitfulness in the midst of barrenness; and, they always saw this fruition (Genesis 17:1).

Read Full Post »

“ The Angel of the LORD spoke to her (Hagar) . . . So she named the LORD who spoke to her El-roi, God the one who always sees!” (Genesis 16:11, 13). The first thing, which becomes clear in this passage, is that the one who reveals himself to Hagar, is not merely a heavenly being. It is the LORD himself. It is the incarnation of God. It is the Messiah before he became incarnate as Jesus (cf. Genesis 21:17, 19; Exod. 14:19). The second crucial aspect of this text is that God reveals himself to a Gentile woman. Mind-blowing! Especially to those who think that God did not reveal himself to women, and Gentiles!

Read Full Post »

“Abram believed (Hebrew. Amen) the LORD, and he considered to him as a mandate for justice.” (Genesis 15:6). The Hebrew word, tsedakah, is usually translated as “personal righteousness.” However, the Hebrew sense is more toward others. The worldview of Abraham and Jesus are not personal righteousness oriented. It is oriented towards bringing about God’s justice and rightness upon the earth.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »